Port automation best approached in stages

Lars Ambrosy Lars Ambrosy: “I would say automation is a big opportunity to prove something." Credit: Port Strategy

Taking a step-by-step approach to automation is sensible because it allows for time for terminals to become orientated with functionality and processes, the managing director of LASE has said.

Taking a step-by-step approach to automation is sensible because it allows for time for terminals to become orientated with functionality and processes, the managing director of LASE has said.

Speaking exclusively to Port Strategy at TOC Europe, Lars Ambrosy stressed that understanding the implementation requirements for automation is important to achieve your goals, as well as making sure employee are briefed and onboard with changes.

He said: “It is good to take everybody with you and reduce the risk by going step by step. It makes it easier and it is also continuous progress. You have to take your staff with you and its very important that they learn to operate the systems and that they are willing to take the next step.”

Bigger vessels

On the subject of making improvements at existing terminals, Mr Ambrosy believes the fact that vessels are becoming increasingly bigger is a driving factor for terminals to change their operations and think about upgrades and digital technology such as apps.

“When you are used to having vessels every other day but are now getting two peak moments during the week you have to handle it and rethink what you are doing and certainly one of the key decisions is whether to go over to automation because you cannot have staff onsite over the whole week and only working during just two peak moments, “ he explained. “I would say automation is a big opportunity to prove something.”

Automation is not just an opportunity for large terminals, said Mr Ambrosy, pointing out that all terminals can decided to which degree they get involved. Changes such as automating a fleet of RTGs can be achievable for smaller terminals and has a knock-on effect for staffing efficiency. “You can replace drivers of 10 vehicles with two or three remote crane operators, so it makes sense,” he said.

Despite the benefits, it’s not worthwhile for some terminals to pursue automation and we will not see 100% of terminals automated, stated Mr Ambrosy. “I think that in 20-30 years I would expect 50% to be fully automated,” he surmised.

LATEST PRESS RELEASES

Siwertell road-mobile capabilities added to Ashdod’s sulfur-handling operations

Bruks Siwertell has secured a further Siwertell ship unloader order from Israel’s Ashdod Port Compan... Read more

SANY Boosting Business in Europe for Container Handling Equipment

SANY Europe have had a very busy 1st half of 2019. Several orders have been secured and machines hav... Read more

SOHAR Port Anticipates Potential Business Opportunities

Muscat, July 2019: With several developmental plans underway, including future projects, SOHAR Port ... Read more

BEST - The coolest terminal in the Med

Hutchison Ports BEST terminal in the Port of Barcelona has recently increased its storage and connec... Read more

SFT participates in extensive Tema Port expansion in Ghana

Meridian Port Services (MPS) invested USD 1.5bn to expand the infrastructure of Tema Port in Ghana, ... Read more

LASE opens first office in Australia

LASE announces local presence in Perth, Australia in order to support the growing base of Australian... Read more

View all