TT Club's four-step approach to safety

Peregrine Storrs-Fox: “While incidents often result from human error, their volume is determined by how well safety systems and procedures are implemented Peregrine Storrs-Fox: “While incidents often result from human error, their volume is determined by how well safety systems and procedures are implemented"
Industry Database

Work place injuries still account for almost a third of insurance claims costs for ports and terminals according to TT Club analyses.

Happily, the risk expert says, four procedures, as long as they are enforced consistently, can help port and terminal operators to reduce risk.

“While incidents often result from human error, their volume is determined by how well safety systems and procedures are implemented,” said Peregrine Storrs-Fox, risk management director, TT Club.

“At heart, this is reflective of the culture of an organisation, controlled by management. Improving safety is multifaceted, recognising that humans are prone to make mistakes; no amount of training will eliminate all errors.”

Four steps to safety

Firstly, he said, terminals should implement one-way traffic flows reduces collisions dramatically. The immediate perception may be that this will compromise productivity, but most facilities have found that not only do accidents reduce but productivity increases.

Next, reducing the number of third party or non-handling vehicles and pedestrians allowed into the terminal yard immediately minimises incidents; nobody should be allowed to roam unsupervised.

Equally pedestrians should not be allowed on the terminal at any time; terminal staff and any other personnel should be transported in company vehicles.

Proper lighting, reflective stop signs and illuminated painted walkways additionally help reduce slips, trips and fall accidents in a terminal facility.

The third step involves the terminal putting in place proper site induction procedures for external truckers and visitors. A majority of serious injuries in a terminal facility are incurred by external truckers; often because they do not know or follow safety procedures.

Last but not least, a safe area should be provided for truckers to lock and unlock trailer/chassis twistlocks. This should be away from the operational yard, where only external trucks are allowed to stop briefly for this purpose.

In addition to these four steps, operators in the long-term should be to identify safer procedures and re-design or include new technology solutions to reduce the reliance on training, Mr Storrs-Fox said.

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