Lase and Visy take on damage detection

Laser technology is used to examine the surfaces of containers and, combined with OCR container recognition and high-resolution imaging, different types of damage can be detected, including bulges, dents, tears and holes Laser technology is used to examine the surfaces of containers and, combined with OCR container recognition and high-resolution imaging, different types of damage can be detected, including bulges, dents, tears and holes

Germany’s Lase Industrielle Lasertechnik has teamed up with Finland’s Visy to produce a “game-changing” product series, developed to enable the automatic detection of damage to containers, without disturbing the workflow.

The LaseCDI/Visy ADDS product series can be used in conjunction with gate operating systems and crane OCR systems. Laser technology is used to examine the surfaces of containers and, combined with OCR container recognition and high-resolution imaging, different types of damage can be detected, including bulges, dents, tears and holes.

Spokesperson for Lase, Christian Jagusch, told Port Strategy the system is unique and claims it’s the first automated damage detection system in with world which does not require operator surveillance.

“Normally container damages are only recognised when camera images have been viewed afterwards and when the affected container itself already has left the port. By applying this system damaged containers are detected and identified immediately during the arrival at the gate or being unloaded from a vessel,” he explained.

With a scan frequency of 100 Hz and an angle resolution of 0.5˚, the data recorded by the laser scanner is sent to dedicated application software, which produces a profile image of the container and displays the detected damage category, extent and location – something Lase says can help terminal operators reduce administration time and labour costs.

“After a damage claim has been made, a huge administration effort has to be made, and it’s here that we can assist terminal operators reduce costs,” Mr Jagusch added. “When a container leaves the port an EIR (Equipment Interchange Receipt) is given to the port authority. The extent and the nature of the damages are also described, otherwise the liability of damages can’t be proven because it won’t be clear whether damages occurred while stevedoring operation or at the yard. The ship-owner or container-owner can easily sustain this damage but not prove the origin.”

The Automatic Damage Detection System for gate operations includes the LaseCDI-Gate solution, which features three 2D laser scanners (Lase 200D series) mounted on the frame of the OCR gate, while for crane OCR, the system includes the LaseCDI-STS solution, which is used for the recognition of damage during STS operations.

Lase told PS it’s seen a great deal of interest in the new series since it’s official launch in early June 2014, with some trails already underway, and more to come in the near future.

LATEST PRESS RELEASES

Enhanced Hazcheck Restrictions Portal Launched, 1 May 2018

Exis Technologies, with the support of leading shipping and freight insurers, TT Club and UK P&I Clu... Read more

Successful participation and presentation at exhibition in Beira, Mozambique

The exhibition series ‘Intermodal Africa’ organized by Transport Events is always a good possibility... Read more

Protectors of Esbjerg's new East Port quay

The German based Headquarters of ShibataFenderTeam recently completed an order for the Port of Esbje... Read more

Aquaplot joins Technology Transfer Programme of European Space Agency

Start-up for ocean route planning enters ESA’s Business Incubation Centre (BIC) Read more

AMRO Increases Scope To Cover The GCC Region

AMRO, a specialist marine equipment and services provider, is proud to announce that they will now c... Read more

SAFE AND SECURE

Ninth Consecutive “Excellent” Coast Guard Security Assessment Awarded to Port of Baltimore Read more

View all