PANYNJ overcomes truck congestion

23 Dec 2015
Truck troubles: Large volumes from container ships have been causing long delays for trucks at PANYNJ

Truck troubles: Large volumes from container ships have been causing long delays for trucks at PANYNJ

Large volumes from container ships have been causing long delays for trucks at The Port Authority of New York New Jersey (PANYNJ), a situation not helped by the multiyear project to rebuild the New Jersey Turnpike.

Steve Coleman, spokesperson for The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, told Port Strategy that there were congestion issues at Global last week due to several factors including the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, the bunching of ships arriving at the terminal and a significant number of trucks all arriving at the terminal very early in the morning.

He said: “Our efforts have included trying to manage the traffic flowing into and out of the terminal as best as we can.  We have had extra queuing space on the Bayonne Peninsula since the week before Labor Day. We extended it further onto the peninsular around the middle of October.

“After last Thursday’s traffic issues, we extended it all the way to the Bayonne Cruise Terminal on Friday morning. It is a resource intensive alternative but one that we have partnered with the City of Bayonne Police Department and Global to develop so as to minimise the impact on the Turnpike. We will use it when necessary.”

He added that congestion issues at the terminal have now cleared.

Apparently GCT Bayonne plans to introduce an appointment system next year to manage the flow of trucks in the terminal which should shorten truck turnaround times and maximise productivity by keeping all cranes busy.

But truckers are sceptical and say that truck turnaround times must be shortened before the appointment system is put in place. They have said that sometimes it’s taking up to eight hours to do a turn, meaning they are only able to make one turn per day as opposed to two or three.

GCT Bayonne is the only option for the largest ships arriving at the US east coast’s busiest port. The Bayonne Bridge’s 151ft height limits clearance for all other ships than can access terminals in New Jersey or on Staten Island, New York.

The project to raise the bridge has been pushed back until 2017.