Union threatens Nigeria port worker stoppage

The MWUN has threatened to remove all its members from the country's ports if the Nigerian federal government fails to resolve problems on all port access roads – especially at the Port of Lagos (image is of Victoria Island in Lagos) Photo: OpenUpEd/flickr/CC BY 2.0 The MWUN has threatened to remove all its members from the country's ports if the Nigerian federal government fails to resolve problems on all port access roads – especially at the Port of Lagos (image is of Victoria Island in Lagos) Photo: OpenUpEd/flickr/CC BY 2.0

The Maritime Workers Union of Nigeria (MWUN) has threatened to remove all its members from the country’s ports if the Nigerian federal government fails to resolve problems on all port access roads – especially the Apapa port.

The Wires section of the Daily Mail website described Apapa as “the catch-all name for Lagos’ two seaports of Apapa and Tin Can Island”.

In a letter signed by MWUN president-general Adewale Adeyanju, the union gave the federal government until February 5 to comply with its demand that it remove all trucks on “Oshodi-Apapa Dual Carriage Way and fill the craters and potholes on the access roads to all the ports to make the roads motorable”.

If these developments have not taken place by February 5, the letter said, the MWUN “will withdraw all its members from the ports nationwide until these two demands are met”, with a strike from this organisation having the potential to effectively cripple port operations across Nigeria.

According to the MWUN, strike action has become necessary because of the Nigerian federal government’s inability to fix access roads into ports across the nation.

In May last year, the union gave the federal government a 21-day ultimatum to repair the roads, but decided to suspend planned industrial action following assurance from the Nigerian Ports Authority that repair work would be undertaken.

“But nine months after the union suspended its strike action, the roads have continued to deteriorate,” said Mr Adeyanju, who added that two union members had died on the Oshodi-Apapa Dual Carriage Way.

“Today, only few vessels now berth at our seaports as most ship owners and businessmen prefer our neighbouring ports, especially Cotonou [in Benin],” he also explained.

“While our neighbouring ports are booming, our ports have been deserted because of the failed access roads to [them], the gateway to the nation’s economy.”

LATEST PRESS RELEASES

NEW CRANE ENTERS SERVICE AT WARRENPOINT PORT FOLLOWING £3 MILLION INVESTMENT

Warrenpoint Port has commissioned a new crane and has commenced the refurbishment of two other crane... Read more

Bigger share of modal split envisaged for inland shipping in the Baltic Sea Region

A vision for inland waterway transport (IWT) in the Baltic Sea Region as well as means to strengthen... Read more

QTerminals reaches new container and cargo handling milestones in record time

Over two million containers and five million tonnes of cargo handled Read more

Bendezu Port Equipment delivered two GOTTWALD HMK 6407 B from BELGIUM to SPAIN

Bendezu Port Equipment GmbH, an international trading company offering second-hand port equipment, h... Read more

ShibataFenderTeam is a member of PIANC Working Group “Guidelines for the Design of Fender Systems”

ShibataFenderTeam looks forward to the fruitful exchange with all WG members and trusts that the out... Read more

CIRCLE S.p.A.: continues its growth abroad with a new cooperation with Bulgarian Ports Infrastructure Company.

Circle S.p.A. (“Circle”), a Company leading its own Group specialized in process and management cons... Read more

View all