Climate change propelling ports' carbon mitigation

Jurong Port Aurecon reviewed the carbon footprint at Singapore’s Jurong Port and investigated opportunities to further reduce emissions at the site
Industry Database

Ports and associated economies have been forced to address their environmental impact because they will be disproportionately affected by climate change.

Aurecon, which this year was commissioned by Singapore’s Jurong Port to review its carbon footprint and investigate opportunities to further reduce emissions, said that climate change has led operators and governments to seek ways of reducing the environmental impact of their shipping and port activities.

Speaking of the Jurong Port report, Aurecon’s project leader, Ameet Ankaikar, sustainability leader in Singapore, said: “The biggest benefit from the carbon footprint assessment is the future-driven sustainability solutions it recommends.

“Not only did we provide an overview of the sources of emissions, we also worked with the port to identify potential abatement measures; the degree of their impact; the ease of implementation and monitoring; and their corresponding financial implications.”

Roadmap

He added the methodology can serve as a roadmap for other port operators to make facilities more sustainable and carbon-friendly.

However, Mr Ankaikar stressed the study showed that both port owners and users, including supply chains, have to collaborate to reduce the carbon footprint generated by their operations.

“Today, 92% can be attributed directly to the 57% increase in ship traffic calling at the port between 2010 and 2016. Hence, to make a significant reduction in the port’s carbon footprint, all stakeholders have a part to play,” he added.

Carbon comparison

The study also compared the port’s carbon footprint with other ports around the world on a normalised, like-for-like basis. This benchmarking showed that Jurong Port’s carbon emissions are comparable to the Port of Long Beach, based on tonnes of throughput and resulting carbon emissions

“Though the institutional context is different for each port, there are a number of universal measures that will allow a useful comparison of sustainable performance. Carbon mitigation is not a competition but a collaboration for a better and more sustainable future for our planet,” Mr Ankaikar concluded.

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